Health & Science

  • Nag your children and keep them safe, local physician says

    Nag your children and keep them safe, local physician says

    One of the most important duties for the parents of teenagers, according to Solana Beach family medicine physician Ellen Rodarte, is to nag their children. “We have to constantly nag them and warn them about the risks of things. That’s our job,” said Rodarte, who practices at Sharp Rees-Stealy’s...

  • To your health: Act fast to stop a stroke

    Every year, about 800,000 people suffer a stroke in the United States. Significant risk factors include atrial fibrillation (a heart rhythm disorder) and hypertension (high blood pressure). Treating these conditions can significantly reduce the risk of first or recurrent stroke. As medical director...

  • Rancho Santa Fe Association board approves fiber-optic engineering study

    Rancho Santa Fe Association board approves fiber-optic engineering study

    The Rancho Santa Fe Association continues to move forward in building its own high-speed fiber-optic network, considered the most important initiative on the board’s agenda this year. At the April 6 RSF Association board meeting, the board approved a $168,832 expenditure for an engineering design...

  • Symposium offers latest on breast cancer treatments, research

    Symposium offers latest on breast cancer treatments, research

    Joan Lunden was busy with her career as a journalist, author and motivational speaker, and didn’t always get her yearly mammograms on time. In 2014, things changed. “I heard those words no one ever wants to hear: ‘You have cancer,’” said Lunden, a former long-time host of “Good Morning America,”...

  • Rancho Santa Fe resident launches company to provide personalized cancer care

    Rancho Santa Fe resident launches company to provide personalized cancer care

    Rancho Santa Fe resident Blaise Barrelet recently launched CureMatch, a new company he believes could be the future of cancer treatment. CureMatch is a decision support platform designed to offer personalized medicine in cancer care. Operating on the belief that cancer is a personal disease that...

  • Two local scientists predicted to win Nobel Prize

    Two local scientists predicted to win Nobel Prize

    By Ashley Mackin For the past 11 years, Thomson Reuters has issued predictions as to who will win the Nobel Prize in science categories, as “Citation Laureates.” This year, two La Jolla-based scientists are included on that list in the “Medicine” category. Tony R. Hunter of the Salk Institute of...

  • James LaBelle. M.D. named Chief Medical Officer for Scripps Health

    James LaBelle. M.D. named Chief Medical Officer for Scripps Health

    Scripps Health has selected James LaBelle, M.D., as Chief Medical Officer and Corporate Senior Vice President. Dr. LaBelle assumes his new position Jan. 1, 2013, succeeding Brent Eastman, M.D., who will retire in at the end of the year. LaBelle currently serves as corporate vice president for quality,...

  • To Your Health: West Nile Virus - What to know

    By Michelle Abbo, MD, Scripps Health As if it isn’t bad enough that mosquitoes leave itchy, swollen welts on their victims that can last for days, this summer’s swarms have brought another problem: West Nile virus. A blood-borne disease that can cause symptoms ranging from mild to life-threatening,...

  • Scripps study shows how greater fault line slippage creates stronger earthquakes

    Scripps study shows how greater fault line slippage creates stronger earthquakes

    By City News Service Scientists have discovered the mechanism in fault lines that can increase the magnitude of earthquakes, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography announced Aug. 29. The study, to be published in the Aug. 30 edition of the journal Nature, explains how a reduction in friction in...